Kompx.com or Compmiscellanea.com

Lightweight web browsers for Linux

Operating systems : Linux

Netsurf : Hv3 : Dillo : Links2

Nowadays the real lightweight web browsers are those without JavaScript and Flash support or with a very limited one. Because a web browser even with the lightest interface becomes heavyweight working with the modern internet crammed with scripts and multimedia. These browsers are not numerous and some of them are moving towards getting JavaScript support - i.e. towards dropping out of the "Lightweight web browsers" category.

Lightweight web browsers may be more advanced - with CSS support. Or less - no CSS support or close to that.

Netsurf - / home page /

Currently the most advanced lightweight web browser for Linux. CSS support is quite solid. Good support of HTML. Feeble support for JavaScript - may be disabled by default. There is a version of Netsurf for *nix systems that can be run without X, using framebuffer of graphic adapter. Created initially for RISC OS and only later ported to Linux. There are also versions for other *nix systems, for AmigaOS, AmigaOS 4, Atari OS, BeOS/Haiku, Mac OS X, MorphOS.

More about Netsurf features )

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

netsurf-browser.org

Image : NetSurf - 1

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : NetSurf - 2

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netsurf

Image : NetSurf - 3

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

ebay.com

Image : NetSurf - 4

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

kompx.com/en/web-browsers-for-dos.htm

Image : NetSurf - 5

NetSurf 3.0 on PuppyLinux 5.2.8:

twitter.com

Image : NetSurf - 6

Hv3 - / home page /

Less advanced lightweight web browser for Linux, but still having considerable CSS support. Weak JavaScript / ECMAScript support. Quite good HTML support. There are versions for Linux and Windows.

More about Hv3 features )

Hv3 20070702:

tkhtml.tcl.tk

Image : Hv3 - 1

Hv3 20070702:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Hv3 - 2

Hv3 20070702:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tkhtml

Image : Hv3 - 3

Hv3 20070702:

ebay.com

Image : Hv3 - 4

Hv3 20070702:

twitter.com

Image : Hv3 - 6

Dillo - / home page /

Partial, improving with newer versions, CSS support. Moderately good HTML support. Fast, faster is only Links2. Various versions of Dillo work in Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X and other *nix systems, RISC OS, on some PDAs and SONY PlayStation2. There are ports to DOS and Windows.

More about Dillo features )

Dillo 2.2.1:

dillo.org

Image : Dillo - 1

Dillo 2.2.1:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Dillo - 2

Dillo 2.2.1:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dillo

Image : Dillo - 3

Dillo 2.2.1:

ebay.com

Image : Dillo - 4

Dillo 2.2.1:

twitter.com

Image : Dillo - 6

Links2 - / home page /

Less advanced lightweight web browser for Linux - no CSS support; before the 2.1pre28 version there was weak, sparing JavaScript support. Moderately good HTML support. The fastest among the discussed - possibly the fastest of all web browsers with graphical user interface. It can be run without X, using SVGALib or framebuffer of graphic adapter. There are versions for Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, other *nix systems, OS/2, AtheOS, BeOS, Windows (Cygwin).

More about Links2 features )

Links2 2.1pre21:

links.twibright.com

Image : Links2 - 1

Links2 2.1pre21:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Links2 - 2

Links2 2.1pre21:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)

Image : Links2 - 3

Links2 2.1pre21:

ebay.com

Image : Links2 - 4

Links2 2.1pre21:

twitter.com

Image : Links2 - 6

Besides the aforementioned ones, there is one more lightweight web browser - Mosaic-CK. But its Linux version is experimental and requires to have additional software installed, which may prove to be troublesome or impossible in some distributions.


Aliosque subditos et thema


Windows console applications. Text editors


FTE : JED : MinEd : Nano : MS-DOS Editor Initially, all text editors did not have a graphical interface. And work with text almost from the outset was one of the main types of user activity on computer. With the invention and spread of low-level and especially high-level programming languages, text editor has become an important working tool of professionals. Then, other users had to use text editors for their daily tasks. So by the time the programs with GUI started to be wide spread, the concept of text editor was already well developed, there were mature, well-designed and implemented specimens of applications for text editing without graphical user interface. Why the text-based versions coexisted with GUI-based ones for very long and still graphical user interface programs have not replaced the console / text-based applications. While the average user is not aware of their existence, he / she does not know the power of vim or emacs, often even MS-DOS Editor, built in all the 32-bit versions of Windows is unknown, none the less, console text editors continue to exist and be developed. As it is the case with the text web browsers, the main line of text-based text editors development is in Linux and other *nix systems world. But under Windows as well, there are several interesting applications. FTE - / home page / Console text editor. Version for Linux, some other *nix systems, DOS, Windows, OS/2. Syntax highlighting support for: C, C++, Java, Perl, Sh, Pascal, SQL, Assembly, PHP, Python, REXX, Ada, Fortran, IDL, LinuxDoc, TeX, TeXInfo, HTML, etc. ASCII table. Various facilities for coding and errors handling. Copying words, characters or text blocks is in the same mode and by the same keyboard shortcuts (except Ctrl+A) as in major Windows text editors with graphical user interface - plus, there may be other variations. FTE 0.49.13: Open file FTE 0.49.13: A submenu FTE 0.49.13: Settings FTE 0.49.13: Opened .php file FTE 0.49.13: Opened .htm file FTE 0.49.13: Opened C code JED - / home page / Console text editor. Version for Linux, some other *nix systems, QNX, OS/2, BeOS, OpenVMS, DOS, Windows. Syntax highlighting support for: C, C++, FORTRAN, TeX, HTML, SH, python, IDL, DCL, NROFF, etc. JED can emulate Emacs, EDT, Wordstar, Borland, Brief. C-like S-Lang language for extra settings possibilities and extensions.

Lynx. Web data extraction


Aside from browsing / displaying web pages, Lynx can dump the formatted text of the content of a web document or its HTML source to standard output. And that then may be processed by means of some tools present in Linux, like gawk, Perl, sed, grep, etc. Some examples: Dealing with external links Count number of external links Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | wc -l Find external links and save them to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it and saves them to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" > file.txt Find external links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | sort | uniq > file.txt Dealing with internal links Count number of internal links Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | wc -l Find internal links and save them to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links) and saves them to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" > file.txt Find internal links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | sort | uniq > file.txt The reason behind using "lynx -dump -listonly" instead of just "lynx -dump" is that there may be web pages with plain text strings looking like links (containing "http://" for instance) in the text of the content, as it is the case with http://www.kompx.com/en/elinks.htm page.