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Extract tar.bz2

Operating systems : Linux

Extracting tar.bz2 files in Linux, command line:

tar jxvf file.tar.bz2

- j : filter the archive through bzip2 [ 1 ]

- x : extract files from an archive

- v : list the files processed

- f : use archive file

The command extracts the contents of a bzip2 compressed archive to the current directory.

Tar creates an archive of one or several files. Then bzip2 is used to compress it. Or both processes are made at once by tar only, with corresponding options employed. The duality of nature - archived and then compressed - is reflected in the extension of the file ("tar.bz2") and requires two procedures to be performed while extracting: decompressing and unpacking. Hence both j (decompress it) and x (unpack it) in the command.


[ 1 ]

Sources for the option letters description: tar(1) - Linux man page and LinuxCommand.org


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