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Renaming files in DOS

Operating systems : MS-DOS 6.0+ [ 1 ]

Renaming files in DOS by REN command

REN FILE1.TXT FILE2.TXT

- Renames FILE1.TXT into FILE2.TXT

REN FILE1.TXT FILE2.HTM

- Renames FILE1.TXT into FILE2.HTM

REN *.TXT *.HTM

- Renames all files with .txt extension into files with .htm extension. Only extensions are changed, the file names proper are left as they were.

Since REN is the shorter form of RENAME command, RENAME may be used instead - as more self-explaining may be.

Renaming files in DOS by MOVE command

MOVE FILE1.TXT FILE2.TXT

- Renames FILE1.TXT into FILE2.TXT

MOVE FILE1.TXT FILE2.HTM

- Renames FILE1.TXT into FILE2.HTM

Both methods of file renaming work in Windows command prompt as well. But there is a certain distinction: MS-DOS, other typical / older DOS'es, command prompt of Windows prior to Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51 use a short filename / 8.3 filename convention. So, for example, REN FILE1.HTM FILE1.HTML is not going to work, there will be "Duplicate file name or file name not found" message. And that is not the case with newer DOS'es or command prompt of newer Windows. It can be not the case in older DOS'es also - if relevant drivers are installed.


[ 1 ]

MS-DOS 6.0+ tested - but it also may happen to work well under other versions of MS-DOS or other DOS'es.


Aliosque subditos et thema

 

Windows console applications. File managers

 

FAR Manager : DOS Navigator : File Commander The concept and requirements to file manager had formed itself back in the DOS epoch. With the spread of operating systems with graphical user interface, other applications facilitating files handling emerged. But for many tasks and for many users orthodox file managers remain the most convenient option. There are file managers with graphical user interface here for a long time already, however console file managers still hold on not only their proper niche, but as well a part of the space belonging in theory to file managers with a GUI. Nowadays file managers can, all in all, the same and in general the same way, but text-based file managers are more responsive to user actions. Also, even if it is not topical enough now, console file managers require less system resources, than GUI file managers of comparable functionality. FAR Manager - / home page / Console file manager for Windows. Among the built-in functions: FTP, Windows network, extensible archive files support, print manager, text editor. Other plugins are available: SFTP/SCP, image viewer, hex editor, syntax highlighting and auto-completion for text editor, some others. FAR Manager 2.0: Console file manager FAR Manager 2.0: FTP, downloading files FAR Manager 2.0: A submenu FAR Manager 2.0: System settings FAR Manager 2.0: Text editor FAR Manager 2.0: MPlayer, playing .mp3 DOS Navigator - / open source project / Console file manager for Windows. A variation of the DOS file manager. There is also a version for OS/2. Archive files support, text editor with syntax highlighting, disk editor, spreadsheet, calculator, calendar, etc.

Netscape 3. Screenshots 1

 

Netscape 3 running under Windows 7 (32-bit). Screenshots 1. Netscape 3: netscape.aol.com Netscape 3: w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp Netscape 3: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netscape_Navigator Netscape 3: ebay.com Netscape 3: kompx.com/en/internet-explorer-3-screenshots-1.htm Netscape 3: twitter.com Download Netscape 3. It may happen to be impossible either to install Netscape 3 or to run it under Windows 7 (32-bit). Try installing Netscape 3 as Administrator then. When installed in the proper way, Netscape 3 can run under Windows 7 (32-bit) quite well.