Kompx.com or Compmiscellanea.com

Lynx. Web data extraction

Operating systems : Linux

Aside from browsing / displaying web pages, Lynx can dump the formatted text of the content of a web document or its HTML source to standard output. And that then may be processed by means of some tools present in Linux, like gawk, Perl, sed, grep, etc. Some examples:

Dealing with external links

Count number of external links

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | wc -l

Find external links and save them to a file

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it and saves them to a file:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" > file.txt

Find external links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | sort | uniq > file.txt

Dealing with internal links

Count number of internal links

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | wc -l

Find internal links and save them to a file

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links) and saves them to a file:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" > file.txt

Find internal links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file

Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file:

lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | sort | uniq > file.txt

The reason behind using "lynx -dump -listonly" instead of just "lynx -dump" is that there may be web pages with plain text strings looking like links (containing "http://" for instance) in the text of the content, as it is the case with http://www.kompx.com/en/elinks.htm page. "Lynx -dump" would send to output formatted text where real links and plain text links like strings would look just the same and grep would not be able to discern one from another. "Lynx -dump -listonly" gives only a list of links, so that there is no confusion with plain text links looking strings.


Aliosque subditos et thema

 

Screenshots in DOS

 

There are several programs for taking screenshots in DOS. SNARF, for instance. Using this application succeeded in taking screenshots in most of the cases. Also, the screenshots' quality (.BMP files) by SNARF results to be the highest among the programs tested: ScreenThief, VideoThief, FLIP, GRABBER, SNARF. Using SNARF with default settings is straightforward, but there is a shortcoming - SNARF always saves screenshots to the folder where the user is currently in. That could be inconvenient or unacceptable. And there is no obvious way to change it. But there is a roundabout option. The initial idea had been found on this page. The result based on it: 1. SNARF [ Download ] 2. Open SNARF.EXE in a text editor in text mode (not hex), find snarf000.bmp and replace it for s:scn000.bin 3. Create a batch file, S.BAT for example, where besides a string for starting SNARF.EXE will be a command assigning the path to the folder screenshots will be saved into to a virtual drive S: The folder and path may be any: C:\SOFT\SNARF.EXE SUBST S: C:\SCREENS\ 4. Start SNARF: S [or S.BAT] 5. To take a screenshot: Alt + S There will be two beeps. The first at the beginning and the second one as a sign the process has completed successfully. After the screenshots are taken, go to the folder where they are saved in and replace the file extensions from .BIN to .BMP SNARF - Freeware.

Windows console applications

 

Some time ago text-based applications were the only form of software of average end user computer experience. As well as after the graphical user interface programs started to become widespread, console applications used to retain their strong positions. But gradually GUI software virtually superseded text-based applications in daily use of the average end user. However, even now there are console programs that can more or less compete with software of graphical user interface, be useful for the average user to solve various problems and fulfill numerous tasks on modern computers. Windows console applications. File managers Windows console applications. Multimedia Windows console applications. Web browsers Windows console applications. Text editors Besides file managers, multimedia programs, text editors, web browsers, there are plenty of other text-based programs and utilities for use under Windows: both standalone and those included in MS Windows distributions. For example, ipconfig and netstat for work with network, Windows built-in FTP client useful for some tasks, CommandBurner for command line burning CD / DVD or cdburn with dvdburn from Windows Server 2003 Support Tools for the same, etc.