Kompx.com or Compmiscellanea.com

Windows console applications. Web browsers

Operating systems : Windows

Lynx : Links : ELinks

Text-based, or console web browsers are more typical for the Linux environment and other Unix-like systems. There the text-based web browsers were created, there is their main line of development. Very few (e.g., Wanna-Be / WannaBe for classic Mac OS) console web browsers were made originally for some other operating systems. And the text web browsers for Windows are the versions of console web browsers for *nix systems. Although those of them that do not work in the Cygwin environment have their little peculiarities.

In former times text-based web browsers were an important tool for viewing web documents. With the development of GUI programs further in the dial-up era, text web browsers have been useful as the fastest way to view web documents and as a part of text-to-speech systems. The spread of broadband Internet and specialized soft for text-to-speech systems cut the scope of the console web browsers. All the more, most Windows users have always had a quite vague idea of their existence. However, text web browsers are highly specialized mature tools that may be useful in various situations using Windows.

Lynx - / home page /

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, some other *nix systems, DOS, Windows, BeOS, MINIX, QNX, AmigaOS, OpenVMS and classic Mac OS.

HTML ( More 1 ) ( More 2 ).

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

lynx.isc.org

Image : Lynx - 1

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Lynx - 2

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)

Image : Lynx - 3

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

ebay.com

Image : Lynx - 4

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

twitter.com

Image : Lynx - 6

Links - / home page /

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, some other *nix systems, BeOS, Haiku, OS/2, DOS, Windows. Besides the text version of the browser, there is also a variant capable of displaying graphics, fonts of various sizes with anti-aliasing, working in Linux and other *nix systems both under X (or other windowing system) and using SVGALib or framebuffer of system's graphic card ( Go to ).

HTML ( tables and frames including ).

Links 0.98:

jikos.cz/~mikulas/links

Image : Links - 1

Links 0.98:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Links - 2

Links 0.98:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)

Image : Links - 3

Links 0.98:

ebay.com

Image : Links - 4

Links 0.98:

twitter.com

Image : Links - 6

ELinks - / home page /

Download ELinks prepared for working under Windows without Cygwin

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, some other *nix systems, Windows, DOS.

HTML ( tables and frames including ). Meagre support for CSS and JavaScript ( More ). Support for 16, 88 or 256 colors palette. Support for tabbed browsing, background download with queueing. Experimental support for BitTorrent protocol.

ELinks 0.11.6:

elinks.cz

ELinks - 1

ELinks 0.11.6:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

ELinks - 2

ELinks 0.11.6:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELinks

ELinks - 3

ELinks 0.11.6:

ebay.com

ELinks - 4

ELinks 0.11.6:

twitter.com

ELinks - 6

Along with lynx, links and elinks, there may be other text web browsers used under Windows - in the Cygwin environment. For instance, the w3m console web browser ( Home page ). Or one of the text-based web browsers for DOS - DOSLYNX.


Aliosque subditos et thema

 

Windows console applications. File managers

 

FAR Manager : DOS Navigator : File Commander The concept and requirements to file manager had formed itself back in the DOS epoch. With the spread of operating systems with graphical user interface, other applications facilitating files handling emerged. But for many tasks and for many users orthodox file managers remain the most convenient option. There are file managers with graphical user interface here for a long time already, however console file managers still hold on not only their proper niche, but as well a part of the space belonging in theory to file managers with a GUI. Nowadays file managers can, all in all, the same and in general the same way, but text-based file managers are more responsive to user actions. Also, even if it is not topical enough now, console file managers require less system resources, than GUI file managers of comparable functionality. FAR Manager - / home page / Console file manager for Windows. Among the built-in functions: FTP, Windows network, extensible archive files support, print manager, text editor. Other plugins are available: SFTP/SCP, image viewer, hex editor, syntax highlighting and auto-completion for text editor, some others. FAR Manager 2.0: Console file manager FAR Manager 2.0: FTP, downloading files FAR Manager 2.0: A submenu FAR Manager 2.0: System settings FAR Manager 2.0: Text editor FAR Manager 2.0: MPlayer, playing .mp3 DOS Navigator - / open source project / Console file manager for Windows. A variation of the DOS file manager. There is also a version for OS/2. Archive files support, text editor with syntax highlighting, disk editor, spreadsheet, calculator, calendar, etc.

Mobile-friendly HTML table

 

If an HTML table is too wide, having too much data, it may not shrink anymore, it gets wider than the available space and breaks page layout. An horizontal scroll added to the table fixes it up. Example: 12345678910 Table_data_1 Table_data_2 Table_data_3 Table_data_4 Table_data_5 Table_data_6 Table_data_7 Table_data_8 Table_data_9 Table_data_10 HTML / XHTML. Code: <table> <tr> <th>1</th> <th>2</th> <th>3</th> <th>4</th> <th>5</th> <th>6</th> <th>7</th> <th>8</th> <th>9</th> <th>10</th> </tr> <tr> <td>Table_data_1</td> <td>Table_data_2</td> <td>Table_data_3</td> <td>Table_data_4</td> <td>Table_data_5</td> <td>Table_data_6</td> <td>Table_data_7</td> <td>Table_data_8</td> <td>Table_data_9</td> <td>Table_data_10</td> </tr> </table> CSS. Code: table {display: block; overflow-x: auto;} /* Extra CSS, just styling the look: */ table {border-collapse: collapse;} table td,th {padding: 10px; border: 1px #000 solid;} Note: the CSS property of display: block makes the table to occupy only as much space horizontally as it is needed to contain the data without shrinking. Not more, not making itself to stretch from the leftmost to the rightmost sides of the available space - even if width: 100% is added to CSS. Example: 123 Table_data_1 Table_data_2 Table_data_3 [ 1 ] As well as Netscape 9.0. [ 2 ] As well as Netscape 9.0.