Kompx.com or Compmiscellanea.com

Windows console applications. Web browsers

Operating systems : Windows

Lynx : Links : ELinks

Text-based, or console web browsers are more typical for the Linux environment and other Unix-like systems. There the text-based web browsers were created, there is their main line of development. Very few (e.g., Wanna-Be / WannaBe for classic Mac OS) console web browsers were made originally for some other operating systems. And the text web browsers for Windows are the versions of console web browsers for *nix systems. Although those of them that do not work in the Cygwin environment have their little peculiarities.

In former times text-based web browsers were an important tool for viewing web documents. With the development of GUI programs further in the dial-up era, text web browsers have been useful as the fastest way to view web documents and as a part of text-to-speech systems. The spread of broadband Internet and specialized soft for text-to-speech systems cut the scope of the console web browsers. All the more, most Windows users have always had a quite vague idea of their existence. However, text web browsers are highly specialized mature tools that may be useful in various situations using Windows.

Lynx - / home page /

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, some other *nix systems, DOS, Windows, BeOS, MINIX, QNX, AmigaOS, OpenVMS and classic Mac OS.

HTML ( More 1 ) ( More 2 ).

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

lynx.isc.org

Image : Lynx - 1

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Lynx - 2

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(web_browser)

Image : Lynx - 3

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

ebay.com

Image : Lynx - 4

Lynx 2.8.5rel.1:

twitter.com

Image : Lynx - 6

Links - / home page /

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, some other *nix systems, BeOS, Haiku, OS/2, DOS, Windows. Besides the text version of the browser, there is also a variant capable of displaying graphics, fonts of various sizes with anti-aliasing, working in Linux and other *nix systems both under X (or other windowing system) and using SVGALib or framebuffer of system's graphic card ( Go to ).

HTML ( tables and frames including ).

Links 0.98:

jikos.cz/~mikulas/links

Image : Links - 1

Links 0.98:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

Image : Links - 2

Links 0.98:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Links_(web_browser)

Image : Links - 3

Links 0.98:

ebay.com

Image : Links - 4

Links 0.98:

twitter.com

Image : Links - 6

ELinks - / home page /

Download ELinks prepared for working under Windows without Cygwin

Text-based web browser. Versions for Linux, some other *nix systems, Windows, DOS.

HTML ( tables and frames including ). Meagre support for CSS and JavaScript ( More ). Support for 16, 88 or 256 colors palette. Support for tabbed browsing, background download with queueing. Experimental support for BitTorrent protocol.

ELinks 0.11.6:

elinks.cz

ELinks - 1

ELinks 0.11.6:

w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

ELinks - 2

ELinks 0.11.6:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELinks

ELinks - 3

ELinks 0.11.6:

ebay.com

ELinks - 4

ELinks 0.11.6:

twitter.com

ELinks - 6

Along with lynx, links and elinks, there may be other text web browsers used under Windows - in the Cygwin environment. For instance, the w3m console web browser ( Home page ). Or one of the text-based web browsers for DOS - DOSLYNX.


Aliosque subditos et thema

 

Lynx. Web data extraction

 

Aside from browsing / displaying web pages, Lynx can dump the formatted text of the content of a web document or its HTML source to standard output. And that then may be processed by means of some tools present in Linux, like gawk, Perl, sed, grep, etc. Some examples: Dealing with external links Count number of external links Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | wc -l Find external links and save them to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it and saves them to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" > file.txt Find external links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http:", sends the result further again to grep that picks lines not starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (external links of the web page) out of it, sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -o "http:.*" | grep -E -v "http://compmiscellanea.com|http://www.compmiscellanea.com" | sort | uniq > file.txt Dealing with internal links Count number of internal links Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), wc counts the number of links extracted and displays it: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | wc -l Find internal links and save them to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links) and saves them to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" > file.txt Find internal links, omit duplicate entries and save the output to a file Lynx sends list of links from the content of a web page to standard output. Grep looks only for lines starting with "http://compmiscellanea.com" and "http://www.compmiscellanea.com" (internal links), sort sorts them and uniq deletes duplicate entries. The output is saved to a file: lynx -dump -listonly "elinks.htm" | grep -E -o "http://compmiscellanea.com.*|http://www.compmiscellanea.com.*" | sort | uniq > file.txt The reason behind using "lynx -dump -listonly" instead of just "lynx -dump" is that there may be web pages with plain text strings looking like links (containing "http://" for instance) in the text of the content, as it is the case with http://www.kompx.com/en/elinks.htm page.

Imapsync. IMAP migration

 

Migrating an IMAP account from one IMAP server to another [ 1 ] / Linux, command line: imapsync --host1 imap.this.com --user1 email@example.com --passfile1 /home/user/imap/passwordfile1 --ssl1 --host2 imap.another.com --user2 email@example.com --passfile2 /home/user/imap/passwordfile2 --ssl2 --skipsize --allowsizemismatch - There is a web site (example.com) and an email box (email@example.com) hosted at a web hosting company. The IMAP server: imap.this.com. The IMAP server supports SSL. - The example.com web site is to be transfered to another web hosting company. So is the email@example.com box with all its contents and keeping its folders structure. The IMAP server of another web hosting company: imap.another.com. The IMAP server supports SSL. 1. Set up an email box named email@example.com and a password to it on the server of the web hosting company the email@example.com mailbox is to be transfered to - from the previous web hosting company. 2. Create two text files in /home/user/imap/: passwordfile1 with the password for the mailbox on the first IMAP server and passwordfile2 with the password for the mailbox on the second IMAP server. 3. chmod 600 /home/user/imap/passwordfile1 4. chmod 600 /home/user/imap/passwordfile2 5. Install imapsync 6. Run imapsync Imapsync transfers a mailbox - keeping its folders structure - from imap.this.com to imap.another.com. SSL is used to enable encryption and passwords are saved to protected files (chmod 600). Migration between two email service boxes may happen to require to make use of more imapsync options [ 2 ]. Like transfering contents of one Gmail.com box to another demands to have "--port1" and "--port2" specified: imapsync --host1 imap.gmail.com --port1 993 --user1 email1@gmail.com --passfile1 /home/user/imap/passwordfile1 --ssl1 --host2 imap.gmail.com --port2 993 --user2 email2@gmail.com --passfile2 /home/user/imap/passwordfile2 --ssl2 --skipsize --allowsizemismatch [ 1 ] A simple and common case: contents of one email box are transfered to another, empty mailbox. But there can be more complicated ones like: Gmail to Google Apps Email Migration and Moving to Google Apps with imapsync. [ 2 ] For more command options: Migrate mail from one server to another with imapsync and imapsync(1) - Linux man page.